AMERICAN UNIVERSITY | WASHINGTON COLLEGE OF LAW

Health Law & Policy Brief

The Health Law & Policy Brief is an online publication run by law students at American University Washington College of Law. Founded in 2007, the Health Law & Policy Brief publishes articles on a wide array of cutting-edge topics in health law. Such topics include health care compliance, fraud and abuse enforcement, health insurance payment and reimbursement issues, intellectual property issues, international human rights issues, FDA initiatives and policies, and a host of other matters. Beginning with a staff of just five, the Health Law & Policy Brief now boasts over twenty members and nearly 1,500 readers.


Latest from the Blog

Returning to Work: Do I have to get vaccinated?

Mariana TeranApril 26, 2021
As employees start to head back to the office there is one question on their mind – do I have to get vaccinated to go back to the office?  While many employees voluntarily chose to get the Covid-19 vaccine, others are concerned about losing their job if they choose not to […]

Overhauling The U.S.’s Crumbling Infrastructure: Access to Clean Drinking Water is a Human Right

Alexander NaumApril 26, 2021
Seven years ago, the U.S. media began reporting on the water crisis in Flint, Michigan. While the City of Flint has finally replaced its pipes and the 95,000 residents of Flint have become eligible to receive a portion of a $650 million dollar settlement, many residents of Flint still do not […]

Where Do the Vaccines Go From Here? Issues With Vaccine Quality and Supply During COVID.

Shelby TaylorApril 26, 2021
As the US begins to turn a new page since the Pandemic first devastated our country in 2020, many Americans plan to be vaccinated in efforts to return to life as they once imagined. The Biden Administration has placed tremendous support and funding behind vaccines produced by Pfizer, Moderna, and […]

Numbers Can Lie: Gaming the Medicare Rating System in Nursing Homes and Long-Term Care Facilities

Christiane CardozaMarch 31, 2021
As of March 2021, over 174,000 people living and working in nursing homes and long-term care facilities in the United States have died as a result of COVID-19; these deaths account for approximately forty percent of the COVID-19 deaths that have occurred in the United States. Many government officials, on […]

Weakening Roe v. Wade: Conservative States Have a Plan

Delaney Biddy-HoffmanMarch 31, 2021
In 1965, illegal abortions performed in unsafe settings made up one-sixth of all pregnancy-related deaths. In 1973, the Supreme Court addressed this issue in the landmark decision from Roe v. Wade by holding that access to safe and legal abortion is a constitutional right. States that do not agree with […]

State Ban Puts Abortion Rights at Jeopardy Once Again

Hannah ZuckermanMarch 31, 2021
Before the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Roe v. Wade, women went great lengths to end unwanted pregnancies. Those with money traveled to countries where abortion was legal or persuaded their family physician to illegally perform the procedure. Other women were limited to self-induced abortions, using household items like hangers, […]

Can we disclose? School Privacy Issues During COVID-19

Shelby TaylorMarch 1, 2021
As COVID-19 continues to spread in the US, teachers, students, and their respective communities face tough privacy issues. Typically, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) delineates patients’ privacy rights regarding the disclosure of protected health information. However, this is not the case for student health information. The Family […]

Algorithmic Discrimination against Black Americans in Healthcare

Byron G. Mobley IIMarch 1, 2021
As technology continues to advance, hospitals and healthcare providers have gained the ability to utilize artificial intelligence (AI) and algorithms to automate many of the complex decisions that were once only capable of being made by human beings. AI is now used to detect and diagnose diseases, screen patients, and […]

A License to Discriminate in Health Settings

Alexander NaumMarch 1, 2021
In a recent federal court case, Religious Sisters of Mercy v. Azar (2021), a coalition of healthcare entities affiliated with the Catholic Church attacked a nondiscrimination provision under Section 1557 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). The U.S. District Court in North Dakota granted a permanent injunction […]

Are Abortion Pill In-Person Requirements During COVID-19 Unduly Burdensome? SCOTUS Says No.

Riley DriscollMarch 1, 2021
Medication abortion, commonly referred to as the abortion pill, is a safe and effective way to terminate an early pregnancy and has been available in the United States for the past 20 years. The abortion pill is as safe and effective as the surgical procedure, but it can be administered […]